13 Resources for Teachers from Google


These 13 resources are all free and may help you in using technology in your classroom.

by Susan Brooks-Young

Twenty years ago Google was a search engine, period. That started changing in 2000 through a series of acquisitions, partnerships, and internal projects.

Today Google offers a wide variety of tools, apps, and extensions, many of which are well-suited for use in K-12 classrooms. With all the changes, it can be a challenge to stay on top of everything.

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Pope Francis


by Jean Grant

Help your students learn more about Pope Francis with this prayer service.


Preparation: Begin by making copies of the Prayer Service for each person. If possible, place a picture of Pope Francis in the gathering space. If an interactive whiteboard is available, the picture or the service text itself could be enlarged to enhance involvement by all. Along with the leader, all students should make three small crosses—one on forehead, lips, and heart—as we do before the Gospel reading in the Liturgy.

All: In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Leader: Pope Francis is the first pope who chose St. Francis of Assisi as his namesake. Following in the steps of his role model, then-Cardinal Borgoglio rode the bus, cooked for himself, and lived in a small apartment. He has given up the papal apartments for a simpler life as pope.

All: O Blessed Trinity, we believe in God the Father Almighty, Creator of Heaven and Earth. We believe in Jesus Christ, his Son, who came as our Savior, died on the cross, and rose from the dead. He offered himself to bring us to Heaven. We believe in the Holy Spirit who breathed courage, life, and Spirit into the Apostles and us. We thank the Trinity for blessing us with faith, hope, and love as members of the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.

All: (all make three signs of the cross, on forehead, lips, and heart) Be in our minds. Be on our lips. Be in our hearts.

Leader: What a blessing we have been given through Jesus’ example and the creation of Sacred Liturgy and the Sacraments. They enrich our lives and draw us closer to the Trinity. We are so loved to have grace flow to us from them. Most of all, we rejoice in Jesus who at the Last Supper gave us the gift of the Eucharist. He left food for his future Church in the beautiful Mass. Thank you, Jesus, for saving us and bringing us to your meal.

All: (with all signing) Be in our minds. Be on our lips. Be in our hearts.

Leader: We were given the Ten Commandments to guide us, to love God above all else, and to love our neighbor as ourselves. If we treat others as we want to be treated, how can we hurt and wound others? How can we think of unkind things to do or hurtful words with which to wound others? If our hearts are pure and loving, there is no room for hate or prejudice toward others. We were created in the image and likeness of God. We are all special! When we fail, as God knew we would as human beings, Jesus left us the gift of Reconciliation to make our souls once again as clean and bright as new sparkling snow in the morning sunshine. God’s love is infinite. It never ends. When we make bad choices he is ready to gather in his lost sheep when we tell him we are sorry for our sins.

All: (with all signing) Be in our minds. Be on our lips. Be in our hearts.

Leader: We want and need to join Jesus and take time to pray! He gave us the Our Father, and from that lesson we can choose so many ways to pray. Talk to Jesus from the heart as your best friend. From our rich history and collection of prayers over the centuries, help us to take advantage of quiet moments and the inspiration of those prayers. Dear God, shut out the noise of this hectic world and let us listen for you in the rustle of leaves, gurgling water, radiant blue skies, and other faces of creation. Let us pray for peace in the world amongst all nations.

All close with a Glory Be in honor of the Trinity.  

 


Source: Today’s Catholic Teacher, April/May 2014

QR Codes in the Classroom


by Susan Brooks-Young

QR codes are making a jump in the world of education. Find out how you can incorporate them into your classroom.


You’ve seen the square black-and-white codes that appear on everything from newspaper and magazine pages to soft-drink cups and cereal boxes. Called QR codes, these scannable images are designed to provide quick links to a variety of digital resources: websites, images, audio recordings, and more.

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